Beckon songwriting duo calling for video clips of ‘anything beautiful’

Connie Rossiter, left, and Beth Hamilton, who perform as Beckon are asking fans to share 10-second video clips showing Beautiful Life moments for their first commercial video. BILL HENRY/The Sun Times/QMI Agency

BILL HENRY
Sun Times staff
Beckon wants fans to share short video clips for the duo’s Beautiful Life video.
The Owen Sound area singer/songwriters, Beth Hamilton and Connie Rossiter, are asking for video clips 10 seconds long showing your beautiful moments — a wedding, a child’s first steps, and especially scenes from this area.
“It could be anything,” said Hamilton. “Say you run a marathon and you cross the finish line. It could be riding a bicycle. It could be raindrops on a window pane, anything beautiful.”
People can also use beach pebbles, building blocks, finger paints or anything else to spell out Beautiful Life somewhere interesting for the project.
“We’re hoping that we get a lot of local footage, that would be very meaningful for us,” Rossiter said.
It’s the duo’s first commercial video, and the song will be the first single released from their first CD. Plans are to film this month at Hamilton’s teaching and music studio space in the Timothy Christian School Building.
They’ll empty the old classroom and film a performance April 9 at the old upright piano, with plans also to shoot scenes at Sarawak Park if the weather suits that day.
The finished video will include clips of their own family and friends, a glimpse at their own beautiful life, along with the contributed clips.
To participate, just upload your short video clip, less than 20 seconds, by April 15 to Beckon’s facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/beckonofficial or email the clip to beckon.official@gmail.com Clips should be less than 20 seconds.
The video director will contact people whose clips are selected.
Beckon received funding for both the CD project and the promotional video from the Foundation Assisting Canadian Talent On Record.
Written together for the EP they produced in time for last year’s Summerfolk shows, Beautiful Life is one of 11 all original songs Hamilton and Rossiter are finishing up now in the studio for a CD release June 1. Also through the FACTOR funding, a 40-date tour around Ontario will
follow over the next several months.
“It’s been a long process and we’ve been going about 100 miles an hour” to complete the projects, Rossiter said recently. Both singers have day jobs to support “doing what we love,” she said.
The duo’s connection began several years ago in Orangeville, when Rossiter enrolled her son Gabriel in Hamilton’s Kindermusik classes. Their friendship became a singing and songwriting and eventually a performing partnership, not long after Rossiter, from Kemble, moved back to the area, followed not long after by Hamilton, originally from Ajax.
“If we hadn’t signed up for that Kindermusik class, none of this would have happened,” Rossiter said.
They quickly established a local following and connections with the Georgian Bay Folk Society, for a partnership hosting singer/songwriter workshop sharing sessions which they still run monthly at Hamilton’s studio.
Both women said writing and sharing songs is where their shared interest began, with no plans then to perform and eventually produce a CD and video.
“We do approach the writing first,” Hamilton said. “We didn’t start doing this because we love being on stage and we wanted to be stars. We got into this because we love songwriting and then it blossomed into the performance part. That’s why we perform our own songs. That’s the essence of what we’re doing. We’re singer-songwriters.”
During seven years writing and performing together, they said the songwriting partnership has grown and deepened in trust and respect, so they can now write honestly together, without fear.
“It just boils down to chemistry,” Rossiter said. “There has to be a whole lot of trust.”
“We really have this trust where our egos aren’t in the way,” Hamilton added. “It’s positive and it’s constructive and no feelings are every getting hurt, so we can just write the best music.”
They also wrote several of the songs on the CD with co-writer Carrie DeMaeyer, introduced by their Juno-nominated record producer J. Richard Hutt, who has Cedar Tree Studios in Kitchener. Much of the material was produced during “fun Fridays” -dedicated writing days when the three women would get together to create new songs.
Beckon applied for the FACTOR funding in 2010, received the support in 2011 for the CD and have been working on the project and a related business and promotion plan since then, they said.
Beautiful Life began as a “noodle” from Rossiter on the piano, which fit the need at the time for some more upbeat music to balance the many ballads in the Beckon repertoire. Rossiter and Hamilton began with a verse and chorus, and then a title and some key words.
“The idea was to follow a life from the beginning,” Rossiter said. “I had the first few lines and a chorus and then it was just like filling in the blanks/”
With a bridge that hints at turbulence and shifting ground, the life-affirming song provided an aspect of self reflection.
“When you get caught up in how difficult things are, you need to stop and pause and remind yourself about what’s beautiful right around you,” Rossiter said. “It’s easy to get caught up in every day troubles.”
You can hear the EP version of Beautiful Life on Beckon’s web-site http://www.beckonofficial.com or download it from iTunes. The “up-tempo, catchy, piano pop tune,” as described in a Beckon media release, includes Mark Mariash on drums and Mark McIntyre on bass. That group and others are recording the song again in a more commercial, radio-friendly arrangement for the new CD and single.
Filmmaker Sean Cisterna will direct the music video.
bill.henry@sunmedia.ca

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New director Regan MacNay shaping Georgian Bay Concert Choir sound

Regan MacNay, the Georgian Bay Concert Choir's new director this season, will lead the 70-voice choir and several soloists in a Good Friday performance of the Mozart Requiem April 6, 2012 at 7:30 p.m. at Georgian Shores United Church. BILL HENRY/The Sun Times/QMI Agency

By BILL HENRY
Posted 1 hour ago
Regan MacNay had her sights on a percussion career with a major orchestra. Her dedication to practising many hours every day at Western University led to serious tendonitis. It numbed her arms and ended any dreams of drumming.
Doctors doubted MacNay would regain full use of her arms.
So the Wiarton musician, singer and now educator and music director with both the Georgian Bay Concert Choir and the Georgian Bay Children’s Choir was forced to change plans.
“It was earth shattering at the time,” MacNay said recently. “Now I realize it was probably a good thing because it forced me to broaden my knowledge and my learning.”
A singer all her life, starting in Grade 7 with the acclaimed Children’s Festival Chorus in Port Elgin, MacNay redirected her musical focus toward composition, conducting and music history, along with English literature and an eventual Masters degree in that discipline.
She taught music and English and led a 60-voice choir at a Belleville private school for three years, then taught at Peterborough before returning home to Wiarton. This is her second year as a music and English occasional teacher with the Bluewater board and MacNay’s first year directing both choirs.
On Good Friday, April 6, at Georgian Shores United Church, MacNay will lead the 70-voice Georgian Bay Concert Choir and soloists through the entire Mozart Requiem Mass in D Minor and two other shorter works for an Easter themed concert.
“It’s a big sing,” MacNay said. “It’s not a light, fluffy piece. Mozart was writing this on his death bed and it has some of that feeling. There’s that element of gravity to it.”
And with its intricate score, voiced to challenge singers at the high end of each section’s range, Mozart’s Requiem meets the concert choir’s mandate; offering local audiences big, challenging, important choral works.
Owen Sound-raised soprano Claire Morley, mezzo Vicki St. Pierre, tenor Adam Bishop and baritone Andrew Tees are soloists for the performance, with organist Ian Sadler.
MacNay was raised on the edge of Wiarton in a house filled with music. Her mother Arlene is a piano teacher with a long association with the Wiarton Community Choir. Her father Ken played piano, sang and was a pipe major. Brother Sterling is a music therapist and a local performer while brother
Ramsey, a Hamilton-area pediatrician, is a proficient guitarist.
Regan MacNay applied for the GBCC director’s position when it was advertised over a year ago, and took over in September from Henriette Blom.
She was just settling into the role, ready to direct Vivaldi’s Gloria in December, when Linda Hawkins asked MacNay to also take over direction of the Georgian Bay Children’s Choir for the rest of this season.
Realizing her respect for Hawkins, a mentor and former music teacher of hers, and recalling how important her own years were as a young chorister, MacNay accepted.
“I love working with choirs,” she said. “I know looking back how important that experience was for me and I wanted to kind of help kids in this area the same way.”
Through high school at West Hill, MacNay pursued instrumental music with Fred Parsons, and vocal music with David Tupper, a former director of the concert choir.
Despite her years singing in choral groups, until tendonitis curtailed her percussion plans, MacNay had never considered leading a choirs.
“I’d always been a singer, I never thought of conducting, then I took a course and I just thought wow, this is phenomenal to shape the sound and to have this response,” she said. “You’re still playing an instrument, but the instrument is the voice and it’s very immediate. Whatever I do with my arms and my hands, they’re going to respond. It’s an incredible feeling. It’s exciting. You get a charge out of it.”
“I love vocal music. I’m passionate about it. I think choirs are so important and it doesn’t mater what age you are,” she said.
“The thing I love abut the voice is that everybody has one. It’s the most elemental part about us. We use it to communicate. When you hear a person’s voice you have a reaction to it. The voice is such an important thing, and when you stand together and sing there’s something that’s just so powerful about it because there are no barriers. There’s nothing between you and the audience.”
MacNay spends hours each week planning rehearsals in detail, approaching the most difficult music first. She said her role is to inspire confidence and bring the best from the musicians and the choir as a whole.
“it’s not about me. It’s about producing the music and being confident about it. I just steer. They’re reading me for the sound we’re looking to produce, but really, it’s them.”
Getting to that stage also means working on her own confidence, and overcoming “nightmares” as a performance approaches, which include knocking knees and a sick feeling before taking the baton.
“Inside, I’m a wreck,” she said. “But I get to the podium and I turn to the choir and I’m fine. I’m totally focused.”
Recruitment was among her goals when she took over the position, with plans of helping develop the choir long term and a clear idea of the kind of choir she wanted to direct.
“The choir I’m trying to build is a choir that is 100% committed to excellence in singing. That’s what I want,” MacNay said. “I’m looking for a certain type of atmosphere in my choir, I want very positive committed people who are going to stick with it,”
The choir has grown since from about 25 members to now almost 70, MacNay said.
“They are phenomenal. It’s exciting.”
The Georgian Bay Concert Choir will perform the Mozart Requiem next Friday, April 6 at 7:30 p.m. at Georgian Shores United Church in Owen Sound. Admission is $20 for adults and free for children.
bill.henry@sunmedia.ca

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Carol Duronio ‘channeling’ Broadway Babes for Georgian Bay Symphony show

Lion's Head singer Carol Duronio, right, with conductor John Barnum and the Georgian Bay Symphony Orchestra rehearse on Wednesday February 29, 2012 at OSCVI Regional Auditorium in Owen Sound for a Broadway Babes concert Saturday, March 3. JAMES MASTERS/QMI Agency/The Sun Times

Lion's Head singer Carol Duronio, right, with conductor John Barnum and the Georgian Bay Symphony Orchestra rehearse on Wednesday February 29, 2012 at OSCVI Regional Auditorium in Owen Sound for a Broadway Babes concert Saturday, March 3. JAMES MASTERS/QMI Agency/The Sun Times

BILL HENRY
Sun Times staff
Carol Duronio’s move to Lion’s Head added new notes at both ends of the singer’s range.
Getting away from Windsor also put a stop to the the lung inflammations after seven bouts with pneumonia while she lived in Canada’s most polluted city.
“It completely saved me,” Duronio said this week.
The trained vocalist has played numerous leading music theatre and operatic roles with both Theatre Alive! and Windsor Light Opera, often at that city’s largest, 1,200-seat theatre.
Her move to Lion’s Head a little more than four years ago has meant fewer theatre and performance opportunities for Duronio, although she did have the lead last season in Owen Sound Little Theatre’s Hello Dolly.
Saturday night, for the first time, she will perform with The Georgian Bay Symphony in a pops concert at OSCVI Auditorium. It will also be the test run for Broadway Babes — a package Duronio put together with songs from six theatre roles she’s played, and a few songs she’s always loved, for performance with community orchestras.
Doronio will say a few words about her characters in Annie, Cats, Oliver, Into the Woods, Evita and A Funny Thing Happened on The Way to the Forum, to set the songs up for the GBS audience.
“I’m not just singing the songs, I’m going to act them out with a few clothes changes and one actual costume,” she said. “I’m channeling the characters in a lot of different musical theatre. Those characters that became known as darlings of Broadway. I’m not the Broadway Babe, I’m channeling the Broadway Babes.”
The 7:30 pops concert, as part of the 40th anniversary season, is likely to be both popular and accessible for people wanting to discover the community orchestra, manager David Adair said recently.
Duronio has selected Broadway hits in several styles – smooth songs, blues, Broadway Belt and rock.
“Every mature female singer wants one more time to be a rocker chick, which is why I’m going to sing Winner Takes It All, from Mama Mia.”
Although she trained as a soprano, most of what the GBS audience can expect tomorrow night will feature Duronio’s other voice.
“The great thing about musical theatre is that you perform songs that run the gamut of styles, from jazz to blues to Broadway Belt to nearly operatic,” she said in a telephone interview.
“I was trained as a classic ally-trained soprano for opera, but this is more fun,” Doronio said with rattling, gravely laugh. “You’re using a head voice when you’re an operatic singer, a soprano, or for church music, but you’re using a chest vice when you’re just belting out a popular tunes and I have both of those and I keep them both well-trained.”
Now in Lion’s Head, with fewer opportunities to perform, it’s important to keep the voice in shape, she said.
“The vocal chord is a muscle. If you don’t use it you lose it,” she said. “It’s a 45-minute-a-day workout. I get a lot of cooking and cleaning done as I wander around the house doing my workout.”
While this GBS concert is her first full show with a community symphony orchestra, she has performed a few songs over the years with the Windsor Symphony and routinely worked with anywhere from 17 to 25 pit musicians in musical theatre there.
Her plan is to promote the Broadway Babes package with other community symphony orchestras.
“For me, this is a baby boomer finally doing the big gig, or pursuing a whole new dream of finally doing a single big gig with symphony.”
Tickets for Broadway Babes Saturday, or the 40th anniversary season finale Russian Spectacular, April 14, with Owen Sound-raised pianist Katie Gleiser, both at OSCVI Auditorium, are available at the door or through the GBS office at 519-372-0212.

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Owen Sound show among Tommy Hunter’s final farewells

Country music legend Tommy Hunter is making Owen Sound one of the last stops on his farewell tour. Here he performs during the 22nd annual Havelock Country Jamboree on Aug. 20, 2011 in Havelock, Ont. QMI Agency photo.

BILL HENRY
Sun Times staff
A capacity crowd in Owen Sound will say goodbye to Canada’s Country Gentleman next month at one of Tommy Hunter’s last concerts.
The sold out 2 p.m. show March 17 at the OSCVI Auditorium falls just three days before Hunter wraps up in London what he vows will be his final tour, on the singer’s 75th birthday, in the city where he was raised and first performed at the age of nine.
Hunter’s warm, genial, no-nonsense approach to country music eventually made the singer one of Canada’s most popular television entertainers, with his own high-profile weekly CBC show for 27 years and another nine with Country Hoedown before that.
“I just feel it’s the right time to say goodbye,” Hunter said in a recent telephone interview with The Sun Times. “I can still sing and perform, so it’s a good time to go out. I just feel it’s a good time to hang it up and say goodbye and sit back and relax and do some other things.”
The Owen Sound concert, his first here since 2006, is now sold out, according to the artist’s website. It’s one of several sellouts on this 25-show Eastern Canadian tour, which began Feb. 19 in St. John’s.
The performances encapsulate everything his fans came to expect from his TV program — honest, straight-up, old-fashioned country music Tommy Hunter style.
“The audience is basically the people that watched a television show and invited me into their living rooms for many, many years,” he said. “My success came from television, so when we do a show, it’s a trip down memory lane for any of the people that watched the show.”
He’ll include familiar songs, his own and some from classic country performers like Wilf Carter and Johnny Cash, and, as always, expect a recitation.
At 74, long away from the competitive, weekly TV grind – The Tommy Hunter Show last aired in 1992 -Hunter said he rarely listens now to modern country performers, but sometimes likes what he does hear.
He’s more inclined to tune his satellite radio to classical music, or sometimes a bluegrass or classic country station. He likes the old masters of country music, recorded live in the studio, on tight timelines. That music still sounds real and present, while new recordings, with months of studio sampling and cutting and pasting track on track for perfection have “a freshness that just isn’t there.”
When the old masters — the Hanks (Snow and Williams), or Ernest Tubb — come on the satellite station, he’ll stay tuned.
“The minute they go into rock I’m out of there and by and large and I go right back to the classic stations,” Hunter said.
Hunter won’t perform the new country music, not because he can’t or because he doesn’t like the songs, but because that’s not what his fans come to hear.
“I could do the whole hit parade if I wanted to, but my audience wouldn’t relate to that. They relate to the older type of songs. That’s what they remember, that’s what they want,” he said.
What he wants is for his friends and fans to clap, tap their feet and sing along if they like. “That’s the type of show we do.”
From the first days of The Tommy Hunter Show, which began in 1965, he said he knew the kind of program he wanted to present, which has changed very little since. It would be about the music, without barnyard trappings or hillbilly hokum common then when U.S. networks presented country music.
“That would have been the easiest way to go, is to put a barn and chickens and cattle and bales of hay and pitchforks and we take off our suits and put on a pair of dungarees. And, boy, I hated that idea. I just absolutely loathed that,” he said.
“I didn’t want to be a hayseed and I didn’t want it to reflect on people that were in the agriculture business. It would almost appear as if we were poking fun at those people. But the main reason was that I thought that our music had elevated to a point where we didn’t have to apologize for it.”
Instead, he presented the music with dignity and respect, although he credits his full CBC team with the show’s long success.
“I was one spoke in a large wheel.”
Hunter always performed in a suit, and eventually earned the reputation as Canada’s Country Gentleman. He has been inducted into the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame, is a three-time Juno winner and a member of the Order of Canada.
Tommy Hunter performs at the OSCVI in Owen Sound at 2 p.m. March 17. bhenry@thesuntimes.ca

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Lupercalia founder Josh Richardson has an appetite for festival growth

Tara MacKenzie sings at The Roxy Theatre during Lupercalia 2012 with the MacKenzie Blues Band. JOHN FEARNALL/for The Sun Times.

BILL HENRY
Sun Times staff
Lupercalia + ? = ?
With a buzz downtown, still, after last weekend’s Lupercalia, festival, founder Josh Richardson was already musing ahead earlier this week. What’s next for his growing grass roots celebration of local music, dance, film, visual arts and spoken word?
Food, among other things.
Richardson is onto something again, don’t you think?
Full, quick disclaimer: With Scatter the Cats and others, I’ve enjoyed the pleasure and privilege of fiddling at both Lupercalia festivals. And I’ve written here about fellow musicians involved in Lupercalia, and its sister event Otherfolk, running the night before Summerfolk, and about Richardson, who I admire for what he’s accomplished.
It’s clear all four of these growing grass roots events which embrace and showcase our local culture have quickly become an important aspect of that culture.
They unify and liven up the downtown – and in mid February – while filling venues and drawing visitors to the community.
So, food.
Good enough reason to stretch Lupercalia to three days?

Lupercalia founder Josh Richardson at the Lupercalia 2012 Friday night concert at The Roxy. JOHN FEARNALL/for The Sun Times.

“I do think that’s the next step. I’ve been thinking about the food and the popularity of local food now and how many great chefs there are around here.” Richardson said during a Bean Cellar chat this week.
“I just thought it would be great to have a bunch of chefs come down to the farmer’s market and have all sorts of food and have a feast. Because that’s what we were doing on the Sunday anyway, was eating with all the artists. It was a great wind down.”
With the addition this year of a new, artistically and financially successful Friday night concert at The Roxy, in addition to some 20 venues Saturday, and 50 acts, about 1,500 people passed “through the gate” during Lupercalia 2012.
The event was a feast of more than just music, though.
As well as the links with supporting music venues, Richardson has also built relationships with downtown cultural facilities, and included dance, film, poetry and spoken word.
Films were at the library. A partnership with the Tom Thomson Art Gallery put visual art, including work from Richardson’s brother Joel, on display in conjunction with Lupercalia. They included design work from Jes Donovan, collage from Cleo Markowitz-Dyer at the gallery.
John Fearnall’s photographs of last year’s festival were on display at The Griffin Gallery in the Roxy lobby, while the gallery at Foto Art featured roller derby by photographer Carlo Obillos.

Headliners The Silver Hearts perform at the Roxy during Lupercalia 2012 while artist Kyle Haight paints. JOHN FEARNALL/ for The Sun Times.


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Big Music Fest back at Kelso Park in Owen Sound June 30: Higgins

DENIS LANGLOIS
Sun Times staff
Mark Higgins says everything is falling into place for Big Music Fest 2012.
The concert promoter said June 30 is now confirmed as the date for the Owen Sound show at Kelso Beach Park.
He said he plans to announce the lineup, which will include seven rock bands, within the next week.
“It will be the best show by a country mile,” Higgins said in an interview Sunday.
He said tickets for the all-ages show will be $59.50.
“It’s fabulous the way it’s going to go down,” he said.
The first Big Music Fest in the area, held at the Wiarton-Keppel Airport in 2009, featured The Tragically Hip and attracted 15,000 people. A year later, the event was moved to Kelso Beach Park and attracted a crowd of more than 10,000. That concert featured Hedley and Our Lady Peace.
Higgins pulled the plug on last year’s Big Music Fest in April, after only 209 tickets were sold over the first seven days they were on sale. The bill was to include INXS, Theory of a Deadman, The Tea Party, These Kids Wear Crowns, Fefe Dobson, Kim Mitchell and Classified. Higgins also called off the outdoor concert in Belleville due to scheduling conflicts.
He said this year’s Belleville Big Music Fest will be held June 16 at Zwicks Park.
dlanglois@thesuntimes.ca

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Charles Glasspool directs collaborative Flesherton student composing project

Click the image above for an AUDIO SLIDESHOW of the Macphail students preparing their SpeakUp compositions.

Click the image above for an AUDIO SLIDESHOW of the Macphail students preparing their SpeakUp compositions.

BILL HENRY
Sun Times staff
Students in Charles Glasspool’s classroom have things to say, both with and about their music.
It’s more like a workshop, with the veteran Silver Hearts performer – now in his first year teaching music at Macphail – at the helm. He’s clearly in charge, but more as a facilitator and collaborator than as a boss, Glasspool said earlier this week in Flesherton.
In class, Glasspool raises his baton. The music flows, slow and steady.
“Okay Katherine, this is your piece, where are you going to go with it?” Glasspool asks.
“Trumpets,” shouts Grade 8 clarinetist Katherine Teeter, as her surprised classmates quickly adjust, join the mix and boost the sound.

Music teacher Charles Glasspool sings with Grade 7/8 class members Katherine Teeter, left, Terren Eagles-Russell, Katie Valjakinen and Holly Adams at Macphail school in Flesherton, where students are cmposing new music under a SpeakUp grant. BILL HENRY/The Sun Times/QMI Agency


Teeter is one of several main composers for the school’s Flesherton Symphony Orchestra project this year.
Funded through a $1,000 education ministry SpeakUp grant, students at the school, and mainly in the 7/8 class, are creating original music inspired by two picture books, the very dark The Island, and the bright, cheerful Symphony City.
With help from some community musicians and high school players with the Grey Highlands band, the plan is to arrange, rehearse, perform and record the finished compositions in a few weeks at a local church.

Terenn Eagles-Russell, left, Jamie Troch and Liam Taaffe, Grade 7/8 students sax players at Macphail school in Flesherton, work on new music as part of the school's SpeakUp project. BILL HENRY/The Sun Times/QMI Agency


Teeter was at her piano, at home, when she came up with the untitled piece she’s thinking of calling Dreams.
“I was basically just sitting there and I was bored and I played a chord and I thought it was pretty,” she said after class.
The music flowed from there.
Composing is something she does “now and then” and plans to pursue after the encouragement during this project, she said.
“I really like how this pushes us to try to make a song.” Saxophone player Holly Adams also created some of her music at home, at the piano, inspired by the Adele hit Someone Like You.
“I just sort of changed it around and turned it into something else,” Adams said.

Clarinet player Lou Tsinos keeps an eye on Macphail music teacher Charles Glasspool during a Grade 7/8 class rehearsal this week for the school Flesherton Symphony Orchestra SpeakUp project. BILL HENRY/The Sun Times/ QMI Agency.


Trumpet player Emilee Jantzen at Macphail school in Flesherton. BILL HENRY/The Sun Times/ QMI Agency

Class pianist Katie Viljakinen hasn’t contributed original music yet, but said the project and Glasspool’s collaborative classroom approach has her inspired to write, soon.
Adams likes the space this project provides to explore and create music.
“It gives us so many choices. We can go so many different ways,” she said “We’ve never had these opportunities. We get to let ourselves be free with our music.”
That is exactly Glasspool’s goal, he said after class.
“The speak up grant is about student voice. It’s for projects that are student directed as opposed to top down ‘I’m the teacher in charge, I am the boss and we’re doing this.’”
Collaboration in music is comfortable and familiar for the Markdale-raised teacher, who worked for awhile as a full-time touring musician.
He helped establish a decade ago the popular Peterborough music collective The Silver Hearts.
Also one of the band’s three primary songwriters and vocalists, as well as playing piano, Glasspool remains active with the group and will be with The Silver Hearts on stage tonight (Friday, February 17, 2012).
It’s the band’s first-ever Owen Sound show at the Roxy Theatre as part of the Lupercalia Winter Arts Festival.
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